CARRY ON, WARRIOR Put It On Your Summer Reading List

I love sharing things that make me happy. Even better, my heart glows when I hear about what makes you happy.

I want us to live well and love well, together. I also don’t want to get old and be boring. If you happen to be a friend of mine, I’m not going to let you!

 My BFF!

My BFF!

So, if you are reading my blog and wondering how I go from blogging about an easy chick pea salad recipe to my new favorite book Carry On, Warrior: The Power of Embracing Your Messy, Beautiful Life, it’s just me hoping somewhere along the way you will find things that will help you live well and love well.

carry on

It takes me forever to read a book (unlike my husband who reads several books a week.) But proudly, I’ve just finished my new favorite book by Glennon Doyle Melton, a New York Times best seller, regular contributor to the Huffington Post and founder of Momastery.com. I had never even heard of her until a recent podcast.

Her authenticity is incredibly inspiring. Anybody that loves Jesus, yoga and says God is a knitter immediately resonates with me! She calls life “brutiful” - both brutal and beautiful. So true!

 "Glennon"

"Glennon"

A few other thoughts from her book worth sharing:

·      If we are humble without confidence, we miss the opportunity to become what we want to be when we grow up. And if we are confident with our humility, we miss out on becoming who we want to be when we grow up.

·      As a child of God, we all have the right to speak, to feel, to think and to believe what we believe. I act on my dreams because I believe that God is not just with me but in me and the reason I can be brave and bold and take risks and spin around in circles with joy!

·      Be confident because you are a child of God, be humble because everyone else is too.

·      Her only constant family rule is that everyone has to keep showing up.

·      Teach your kids to be kind, grateful and brave.

·      Love is not something for which to search or wait or hope or dream. It's simple something to do.

·      Hold space and time for folks.

·      The only meaningful thing we can offer one another is love. Not advice, not questions about our choices, not suggestion for the future.  Just love.

Her letter to her son if he were gay, on page 139, is beautiful and her thoughts on profanity, page 201, made me feel better!

She closed her book with, “when I die, God will look at me and say, ‘Now where were we darling?” Wait...is God a southerner too?